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17 April 2014, Thursday
 
 
Today's Zaman
 
 
 
 

Waterbag technology may help solve water crisis in Middle East

20 March 2009, Friday /M. EDIP YILMAZ
With the Middle East one of the most arid regions in the world, where water supply is always an issue causing trouble to all, waterbag technology stands as a promising means to transport water from Turkey to the region given its time and cost-related advantages, but only if politicians on both sides agree and pave the way for it to be utilized to serve that purpose.

This technology allows for large volumes of water to be transported over oceans. Huge fabric cases filled with water and turned into a modular and fabric pipeline by being connected to one another are used for that purpose.

Among the people of the Middle East who suffer from insufficient amounts of water resources are the Palestinians, who lag behind others and consume only 78 liters per capita per day, a direct result of the fact that the Palestinian territories are two of the poorest areas in the world in terms of fresh water availability. What worsens their situation is the fact that 48 percent of total consumption does not meet the quality of drinking water required by the World Health Organization (WHO), not to mention the significantly increased number of people without access to water due to Israel’s 22-day-long assault on the Gaza Strip at the end of last year.

Speaking to Today’s Zaman on Thursday, Shaddad Al Attili, head of the Palestinian Water Authority (PWA), said he would like to meet with Turkish Environment and Forestry Minister Veysel Eroğlu to discuss the prospects of transporting water from Turkey to Palestine.

However, Al Attili told Today’s Zaman that the project he has in mind is the construction of a pipeline, as it is presently the most common approach to the transportation of water, despite the fact that it is more costly and takes more time than using waterbag technology.

Spragg & Associates project

Terry Spragg, the founder of Spragg & Associates, a worldwide group of over 50 corporations, groups and individuals involved in developing and testing waterbag technology, is planning to go on a demonstration voyage from Turkey to Gaza and Israel in the last quarter of this year and is looking for a Turkish partner for the project. Spragg told Today’s Zaman that their main intention is to establish a permanent delivery system connecting the two sides of the Mediterranean Sea, a move that will be significantly cheaper than transporting water through a conventional pipeline systems.

 
 
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