Three Turks injured as Syrian violence spills over into Turkey

Three Turks injured as Syrian violence spills over into Turkey

Smoke rises from Syria's Tel Abyad border gate on the Turkish frontier. (Photo: AA)

September 18, 2012, Tuesday/ 22:35:00

At least three Turkish nationals were injured in a southern village on the Syrian border as fierce clashes broke out on Tuesday between Syrian opposition fighters and regime forces who are battling for control of a border crossing on the frontier with Turkey, forcing Turkish authorities to tell residents to evacuate the area.

The violence along the border with Turkey, which is a strong supporter of the opposition fighters trying to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, underlines the danger to the region as the Syrian civil war increasingly affects neighboring countries.

A Turkish official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government rules, said Tuesday that government forces and opposition fighters were engaged "in very fierce" battles near the border crossing of Tal Abyad.

The injured include two women and one baby, all of whom were hit by stray bullets and hospitalized in the Turkish border town of Akçakale.

The Turkish state-run Anatolia news agency said six Syrians were injured in the clashes and brought across the border for treatment. Akçakale authorities told residents living close to the frontier not to leave their houses.

The Turkish state TV network TRT also said some opposition fighters had fled to Akçakale to escape the fighting.

Syrian opposition groups confirmed the fighting but had no immediate word on whether rebels had succeeded in gaining control of the crossing. It is believed to be the first time Syrian rebels have tried to seize the border area in the country's northern Raqqa province, most of which is controlled by Assad's forces. Rebels control several other border crossings into Turkey.

On the diplomatic front, a spokesman for Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi said the Egyptian leader told Iran's foreign minister in a meeting on Tuesday in Cairo that relations between the two countries were being hindered by Tehran's support for Syria's regime.

Spokesman Yasser Ali said Morsi told the Iranian minister, Ali Akbar Salehi, that as president he cannot ignore the fact that public opinion in Egypt is overwhelmingly against the Syrian regime, which he said "uses harsh language and violence against people."

The two were meeting as part of a Morsi-sponsored Syria peace initiative dubbed the "Islamic Quartet," bringing together Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Egypt -- all supporters of the Syrian rebellion -- with Iran.

Salehi, whose country is a crucial ally of the Assad regime, is traveling to Syria on Wednesday, where he will meet with Assad and other Syrian officials. Iran has provided strong backing to the Syrian leadership since the uprising began in March 2011.

Meanwhile, Iraqi officials reopened the western Qaim border crossing with Syria to a limited number of Syrian women and children fleeing the escalating civil war.

The mayor of Qaim, Farhan Fitkhan Farhan, said that 100 Syrian refugees entered Iraq through the border crossing Tuesday and more would be let in on a daily basis. But he said only women and children would be allowed, while young men would be denied entry for security reasons.

The crossing was closed last month following fierce fighting between Syrian government forces and rebels on the Syrian side of the border.

In Jordan, Syrian refugees at a Jordanian camp pelted the UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi's convoy with stones during a protest over the international community's failure to stop the bloodshed.

Brahimi, who visited another camp in Turkey the same day, has himself called his task "nearly impossible." But some in Jordan's Zaatari camp shouted slogans implying that his initiative, which involves meetings with Assad, only legitimizes the Damascus regime.

"Leave our camp. By seeing Bashar, you've extended his life," some 200 refugees chanted. Teenagers threw rocks at the vehicles of officials as they departed, according to an Associated Press reporter at the camp. UN refugee agency spokesman Ali Bebe confirmed the protest but said he did not see stones thrown.

Jordan hosts more than 200,000 displaced Syrians -- the largest number in the region. The 31,000 residents of the Zaatari camp have frequently protested against conditions in their settlement, located on a plain in the northern desert. Jordan says the huge influx of Syrians has put pressure on its infrastructure and social services.

Brahimi also toured a camp in the Turkish border province of Hatay. Dozens of Syrian refugees demonstrated outside the camp, waving a rebel flag and denouncing Assad.

Some 83,000 refugees have found shelter in 12 camps along the Turkish border with Syria.

Brahimi said it appeared refugees were being treated well in Turkey and that he hoped for an end to the violence.

"We hope that their country finds peace again and they can return to their country as early as possible," he said.

Also Tuesday, Turkey's Foreign Ministry brushed off Syrian accusations that it was allowing thousands of Muslim extremists to cross into Syrian territory.

Foreign Ministry Spokesman Selcuk Ünal told reporters that Turkey may not even respond to letters Syria sent to the UN Security Council and Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon accusing Turkey of allowing thousands of terrorists access to the country.

"Instead of leveling complaints and making false accusations against various countries, including ours, Syria should look at the situation inside its own country and take the necessary steps to correct the situation," Ünal said.

LATEST NEWS
Other Titles
Click For More News