PKK kills pregnant woman, 6 year old in Batman terror attack

PKK kills pregnant woman, 6 year old in Batman terror attack

The terrorist PKK killed a pregnant woman and her 6-year-old daughter in the southeastern province of Batman late on Monday.

September 27, 2011, Tuesday/ 09:04:00

The terrorist Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), which has recently been targeting civilians in its attacks, killed a pregnant woman and her 6-year-old daughter in the southeastern province of Batman late on Monday, the Batman Governor's Office said in a statement on Tuesday.

The statement said terrorists opened fire on civilians and police in the Yavuz Selim neighborhood, killing eight-month-pregnant Mizgin Doru (35) and her 6-year-old daughter, Sultan Doru. Doru's husband, her 8-year-old daughter and three police officers were also injured in the attack, while three terrorists were also killed.

Doru’s husband, her 8-year-old daughter and three police officers were also injured in the attack, while three terrorists were also killed. Doru’s husband is reportedly in critical condition, but doctors were able to save Doru’s unborn baby, who is being kept in an incubator, the statement said. Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç said on Tuesday in Batman with regards to the terrorist attack that “even wild animals would not do it.” He also said that the government has not been insufficient in its fight against terror.

“We hope that these are the last cries. Be assured that we are doing what we can,” he said.

The Batman incident was not the first in which civilians had been killed by the PKK. Fourteen civilians have been killed and 58 injured over the past 18 days in terrorist attacks carried out by the PKK, which has recently stepped up its attacks. The latest killing of four women in Siirt led to outrage across the country, including the country’s predominantly Kurdish Southeast, with the public calling on the PKK to end its attacks. The PKK attacked a car near a police academy with rifles and hand grenades in the southeastern province of Siirt last Tuesday, killing sisters Nergiz Evin (25), Zeynep Evin (31), Kevser Çekin (25) and Nurcan Olgaç (25). Two other women in the car, Nuran Evin and Gülcan Olgaç, were also injured in the attack.

The PKK attack in Batman killed eight-month-pregnant Mizgin Doru (35). Her husband, Talat Doru, and her 8-year-old daughter, Seyma Doru, were injured.

Meanwhile, Turkish police on Tuesday raided several locations in the southeastern province of Şanlıurfa and detained 17 people on suspected links with the PKK. The detainees reportedly include officials from the Human Rights Association (İHD) and the Education Personnel Union (Eğitim-Sen). More police searches of İHD and Eğitim-Sen premises are still under way. The terrorist attacks come after Turkish warplanes started to bomb suspected PKK hideouts in neighboring northern Iraq, including the main PKK base in the Kandil Mountains in mid-August, in response to the surge in violence.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said last Friday that Turkey would only halt its military drive if the PKK “lays down its arms,” days after confirming reports that government officials had met with representatives of the PKK in Europe. The secret talks, which apparently failed to produce any tangible results, came to light after websites posted an audio recording from an alleged 2010 meeting.

On Sunday, Erdoğan left the door open for dialogue, while saying Turkey would maintain its fight against “terrorism.” “We say it very clearly: We will struggle against terrorism until the end, but we will also negotiate with those who prefer politics,” he said. “Those who prefer politics can talk to us; others can’t.” Turkey has long realized that it cannot win the war through military measures alone, and the government has granted more cultural rights to Kurds such as broadcasts in the once-banned Kurdish language on state television. However, the PKK and the country’s Kurdish political movement insist on autonomy and Kurdish education in schools. The pro-Kurdish Peace and Democracy Party (BDP), which shares with the PKK the support of the public from the same region, faces a tough decision about whether or not to take part in the new Parliament as lawmakers on Oct. 1 when the new Parliament convenes, and end their boycott of the Parliament. Upon news reports that the BDP will not participate in Parliament, Parliament Speaker Cemil Çiçek on Tuesday said that there is “still a long time to go until Oct. 1.” BDP officials met in Diyarbakır on Tuesday to make a decision about taking their seats in Parliament.

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