Germany accused of protecting terrorist from extradition

September 18, 2012, Tuesday/ 17:13:00

A member of the Revolutionary People's Liberation Party/Front (DHKP/C) arrested in Moldova was not extradited to Turkey because of pressure from German authorities to the contrary, a Turkish newspaper claimed on Tuesday.

The Bugün daily claimed that Necmi Suna, a former NCO in the Turkish army who later joined the DHKP/C, is being protected by Germany, with which Turkey has an agreement concerning the extradition of terror suspects.

According to the paper, Suna was sentenced to 12 years in prison in Turkey for his role in the 1991 assassination of retired Gen. İsmail Selen. Suna, who was not kept in custody during the trial, fled to Germany, where he was given refugee status and is believed to be the mastermind behind a number of terrorist attacks that took place throughout the 1990s. Suna has been wanted by Turkey with an Interpol red notice since last year. He was captured in Moldova on May 4 where authorities, who were considering returning him to Turkey, gave in to pressure from active lobbying by Germany. Moldova has officially rejected extraditing Suna on the grounds that the suspect faces life in prison without the possibility of parole. Suna was released after spending 18 days in a Moldovan prison, the daily reported.

Germany has been notoriously unwilling to extradite members of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), the DHKP/C and Hizbullah over the past years. It had also failed to extradite former İstanbul Mayor Bedrettin Dalan, currently a suspect in an ongoing coup d'état plot trial, during the time when Dalan lived in that country before moving to another location. There are also reports that retired Gen. Mustafa Bakıcı, a suspect in another coup-related case, is also hiding in Germany.

The DHKP/C's Suna is known for his former role as the right-hand man of the organization's leader Dursun Karataş, who died in 2011. He is a central committee member of the terrorist organization and one of its key administrators. Turkish intelligence sources believe Suna, who frequently met with Karataş in private, holds information unknown to even the top administrators of the terrorist group.

Turkish prosecutors also accuse him of having spied for the DHKP/C when he was in the Gendarmerie General Command as an NCO. He is also accused of giving the orders for some of the bloodiest acts of the DHKP/C in the 1990s.

Suna, born in 1964 in Adana, is also mentioned in the indictment against the suspects in the trial regarding Ergenekon, a clandestine gang whose suspected members face charges of plotting to overthrow the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government. A secret witness, a former DHKP/C member who testified to prosecutors, spoke about the DHKP/C's post-1989 activities, claiming Suna was actively involved in many of the unsolved murders that occurred after 1989, when Karataş escaped from prison.

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